CSV2GDX

CSV2GDX is a tool that reads a CSV file and writes to a GDX file. There are multiple ways to read CSV files (Comma Separated Values) inside GAMS (see Data Exchange with Text Files for instance), but a number of features available in CSV2GDX make it possible to read a CSV file where GAMS itself cannot be used. In addition to the syntax explanation and the basic functionalities demonstrated on some examples, this tutorial also discusses some advantages and disadvantages of CSV2GDX compared to the GAMS internal table statement.


Usage

CSV2GDX is called by specifying the CSV file and several options to define how to read the data.

csv2gdx filename {options}

Filename

The input file; the .csv file extension is assumed when no extension has been specified.

Parameters can also be read from a text file; the use of an external file for parameters is indicated by preceding the file name with a @ (at sign). When reading parameters from a text file, lines starting with an asterisk (*) will be ignored. See also Example 8.


Options

The following options can be used when calling CSV2GDX:

Option Default Description
acceptBadUels N Indicate if bad UELs are accepted or result in an error return code.
autoCol none Generate automatic UELs for each column.
autoRow none Generate automatic UELs for each row.
checkDate N Write GDX file only if the CSV file is more recent than the GDX file.
colCount none Number of columns in the input file.
decimalSep Period Specify a decimal separator.
fieldSep Comma Specify a field separator.
id none Identifier for the symbol in the GDX file.
index none Identify columns to get UELs from.
output <CSVFilename>.gdx Optional output filename.
password none Password for an encrypted input file.
storeZero N Indicate how zero values are handled.
text none Specify the column to get explanatory text from.
trace 1 Controls the amount of information written to the log.
useHeader N Indicate if the first row is a header row.
value none Specify the column to get the values from.
valueDim N Adds an extra dimension for values.
values none Specify the columns to get the values from.


Note
  • The user has to specify an identifier for the symbol in the GDX file within the parameter id, regardless of the data structure in the CSV file.
  • CSV2GDX determines the number of columns in the CSV file from the header row or from the user defined input specified in the parameter colCount. Therefore, the user must enable the option useHeader or has to specify the number of columns within colCount in any case.


Some more detailed remarks on the options:

acceptBadUels = boolean (default=N)

This option specifies how to proceed, when a bad UEL (e.g. too long) is encountered. If set to N, reading is stopped, and an error is signaled. When set to Y, a valid UEL is made up and reading is continued.

autoCol = string

Generate automatic UELs for each column. The autoCol string is used as the prefix for the column label numbers. This option overrides the use of a header row. However, if there is a header row, one must skip the row by enabling useHeader. This option is demonstrated in Example 3.

autoRow = string

Generate automatic UELs for each row. The autoRow string is used as the prefix for the row label numbers. The generated unique elements will be used in the first index position shifting other elements to the right. Using autoRow can be helpful when there are no labels that can be used as unique elements but also to store entries that would be a duplicate entry without an unique row label. This option is demonstrated in Example 3.

checkDate = boolean (default=N)

Write GDX file only if the CSV file is more recent than the GDX file to save resources when running the model containing the CSV2GDX call multiple times. This option is demonstrated in Example 5.

colCount = integer

Number of columns in the input file. This parameter is required if there is no header row, since CSV2GDX determines the number of columns from the header row. This option is demonstrated in Example 3. Note that the lastCol constant cannot be used for the colCount option.

decimalSep = [Period, Comma] (default=Period)

Specify a decimal separator. The decimal is normally a period, but this parameter allows a comma as the decimal separator, too. Special values recognized are Eps, NA resp. N/A, Inf, True, False, None, Null and Undef (case insensitive). A string that is not recognized as a valid number will be stored as Undef. This option is demonstrated in Example 2 and Example 6 (focusing on reading special values) for instance.

fieldSep = [Comma, SemiColon, Tab] (default=Comma)

Specify a field separator. Fields are normally separated by a comma, but this parameter allows some additional choices. Using tabs as delimiter should be avoided, since text editors act different on handling them. For instance, one must specify tabs in the GAMS IDE explicitly using %system.tab%:

$onEcho > tabSeparated.csv
USA%system.tab%100
GER%system.tab%70
$offEcho

$call csv2gdx tabSeparated.csv id=x fieldSep=tab index=1 colCount=2 value=lastCol

This option is demonstrated in Example 2 and Example 3 for instance.

id = string

Identifier for the symbol in the GDX file. Additional symbols, Dim1, Dim2, ... for the domain sets of the symbol id will be added automatically to the GDX file. Executing CSV2GDX without specifying an identifier will fail.

index = list of columns

Identify columns to get UELs from. The columns are represented as a list of integers separated by comma. For example index=1,2,3,4 resp. index=(1,2,3,4); in this case the notation 1..4 is allowed. Brackets can only be used on Windows systems. The index option is used in all examples.

output = filename (default=<CSVFilename>.gdx)

Optional output filename. If no output file is specified, CSV2GDX will use the input filename and change the file extension to .gdx. If no path is specified, the output file will be created in the current directory. This option is demonstrated in Example 2 for instance.

password = string

Password for an encrypted input file. Use ENDECRYPT to encrypt a file. This option is demonstrated in Example 7.

storeZero = boolean (default=N)

Indicate if zero values are ignored or written as EPS; an empty field is always ignored. This option is demonstrated in Example 6.

text = integer

Specify the column to get explanatory text from when reading a set. For example text=5. This option is demonstrated in Example 9.

trace = integer (default=1)

Controls the amount of information written to the log. Higher values will generate more output. Valid range is 0..3. Set trace=0 to prevent writing any information to the log. This feature is demonstrated in Example 6.

useHeader = boolean (default=N)

Indicate if the first row is a header row. The fields in the header row of the columns specified within the values option will be used as UELs. A header row is not needed or should be ignored when using the colCount or autoCol option. To skip one existing header row while using autoCol, enable useHeader. This option is demonstrated in Example 1 and Example 2 for instance.

value = integer

Specify the column to get the values from. For example value=5. This option is demonstrated in Example 2.

valueDim = boolean (default=N)

Indicate if an extra dimension for values is added to the parameter even if there is just one value column. This is ignored, if there is no value column. This feature is demonstrated in Example 2.

values = list of columns

Specify the columns to get the values from. When using a list of columns for the values and useHeader enabled, each field in the first row of the columns is used as UEL to identify the values in those columns. See also useHeader and autoCol below. If the number of columns is unknown, the symbolic constant lastCol can be useful: values=2..lastCol. This option is demonstrated in Example 1 and Example 5 for instance.


Advances and limitations

Advances

  • CSV2GDX enables the user to read CSV data where the table statement cannot be used without doing further preprocessing, e.g. in case of semicolon- or tab separated data or comma separated decimals.
  • In general, CSV2GDX is a quite performant tool compared to the GAMS internal table statement.

Limitations

  • Suppose we want to skip some rows while reading the data. For example, if the CSV file contains some reference information in a specific row which we do not want to be stored in the domain sets or in the parameter. However, skipping rows cannot be done with CSV2GDX.
  • There might be CSV files with no header and varying, unknown length of rows. Since CSV2GDX determines the number of columns based on the header row or by setting the colCount option in advance, CSV2GDX might return incorrect results or the execution is aborted.
  • Reading several parameters from a CSV file cannot be done directly within the CSV2GDX call. The data must be split later on as demonstrated in Example 4.
  • CSV2GDX cannot read CSV files containing line breaks within a (quoted) field. You will either get an error message - "Quoted field not terminated with closing quote" - or the result might not be correct for unquoted fields, because the field content will be cut by the line break.


Getting Started

We introduce the basic functionalities of CSV2GDX on some simple examples. Note that many CSV files can be read inside GAMS directly using a table statement, but a number of features available in CSV2GDX enable the user to read a CSV file where the table statement cannot be used, e.g. reading files with semicolon separated data or if the decimals are separated by comma instead of a period.


Example 1 - Reading CSV Files with CSV2GDX

The first example of this collection demonstrates the key commands of CSV2GDX. For instance, consider the table statement of the model [trnsport] from the GAMS Model Library:

Table d(i,j) 'distance in thousands of miles'
              new-york  chicago  topeka
   seattle         2.5      1.7     1.8
   san-diego       2.5      1.8     1.4;

The data can be stored in distance.csv like this:

,new-york,chicago,topeka
seattle,2.5,1.7,1.8
san-diego,2.5,1.8,1.4

First of all, CSV2GDX is called now, to generate distance.gdx by processing the input file distance.csv:

csv2gdx distance.csv id=d index=1 values=2..lastCol useHeader=y

CSV2GDX generates one single parameter d and two domain sets from the input file. The name of the parameter in the GDX file must be declared within the id option, while the domain sets for this parameter will be labeled with Dim1 and Dim2 automatically. Column number one is specified as the first domain set within the index option. The values option is used to specify the column numbers 2,3,4 containing the data values. By enabling the useHeader option, the fields of the first row of the columns specified within the values option will be handled as the second domain set. If the number of columns is unknown in advance, one can use the lastCol constant in the values or index option.

CSV2GDX_EXAMPLE1_d.gif
Parameter d displayed inside GAMS Studio


CSV2GDX_EXAMPLE1_Dim1.gif
Set Dim1 (containing the UELs of the first column)


CSV2GDX_EXAMPLE1_Dim2.gif
Set Dim2 (containing the UELs of the header row)


However, to complete the declaration of the sets and parameter for the model trnsport, one must load the data from distance.gdx:

Set
   i 'canning plants'
   j 'markets';

$gdxIn distance.gdx
$load i = Dim1
$load j = Dim2

Parameter d(i,j) 'distance in thousands of miles';
$load d
$gdxIn
display i, j, d;

This example is also part of the GAMS Data Utilities Library, see model [csv2gdx2] for reference.


Example 2 - Reading Semicolon separated Data

In this example, the distances from the previous example are stored as a list. We want to read the cities and the column containing the miles measurement. Note, that the fields are separated by semicolon and the decimals by comma. As described in Data Exchange with Text Files the CSV file must be preprocessed with the POSIX tools in advance to replace commas by dots and semicolons by commas to read the data directly using a simple table statement.

i;j;miles
seattle;new-york;2,5
seattle;chicago;1,7
seattle;topeka;1,8
san-diego;new-york;2,5
san-diego;chicago;1,8
san-diego;topeka;1,4

The data will be stored as distanceOut.gdx by adding the output file option. One can specify the field and decimal separators within the fieldSep and decimalSep option. Domain sets for the parameter to be read are declared by index=1,2.

csv2gdx distance.csv output=distanceOut.gdx id=d fieldSep=semiColon decimalSep=comma index=1,2 useHeader=y value=3

In order to load the data from the GDX file, execute the commands from the previous example. However, note that Dim2 does not contain the UELs from the header row this time, but the unique elements of the second column specified in the index option. The option useHeader is enabled to indicate that there is a header row to be skipped when reading the values. Also note, that the symbol d in the GDX file has exactly two dimensions. It may be useful to add an additional dimension to the parameter dmod, e.g. if different measurement units for the distances may become relevant later on and need to be calculated (kilometer for instance).

This can be done by adding the option valueDim:

csv2gdx distance.csv output=distanceOut.gdx id=d fieldSep=semiColon decimalSep=comma index=1,2 useHeader=y value=3 valueDim=y

The option adds a third dimension to d. Now we want to add the distances in kilometer by calculating the values inside the model:

Set m 'measurement unit' / miles, km /;

Parameter dmod(i,j,m);

$gdxIn distanceOut.gdx
$load dmod = d
$gdxIn
display dmod;

dmod(i,j,'km') = 1.852*dmod(i,j,'miles');
display dmod;

Parameter d (valueDim disabled):

----     36 PARAMETER d  distance in thousands of miles

             new-york     chicago      topeka

seattle         2.500       1.700       1.800
san-diego       2.500       1.800       1.400

Parameter dmod resp. d with valueDim enabled before calculating further measurements:

----     49 PARAMETER dmod 

                         miles

seattle  .new-york       2.500
seattle  .chicago        1.700
seattle  .topeka         1.800
san-diego.new-york       2.500
san-diego.chicago        1.800
san-diego.topeka         1.400

Parameter dmod with valueDim enabled after calculating the distances in kilometer inside the GAMS model:

----     52 PARAMETER dmod  

                         miles          km

seattle  .new-york       2.500       4.630
seattle  .chicago        1.700       3.148
seattle  .topeka         1.800       3.334
san-diego.new-york       2.500       4.630
san-diego.chicago        1.800       3.334
san-diego.topeka         1.400       2.593

This example is also part of the GAMS Data Utilities Library, see model [csv2gdx3] for reference.


Example 3 - Dealing with missing Labels and Duplicates

Missing Labels

The file EUCData.csv contains the extracted euclidean coordinates of the first nine cities of berlin52.tsp from TSPLib. You might want to import the data to calculate a complete distance matrix inside GAMS to find an optimal traveling salesman tour for instance.

565.0;575.0
25.0;185.0
345.0;750.0
945.0;685.0
845.0;655.0
880.0;660.0
25.0;230.0
525.0;1000.0
580.0;1175.0

There is no header row, neither a column with labels to serve as domain sets for the coordinates of the cities. However, CSV2GDX automatically generates UELs for columns and rows by adding ascending numbers to an user-defined prefix specified within the autoCol and autoRow option. Also note, because of the missing header, the number of columns in the file must be manually determined and declared within colCount.

csv2gdx EUCData.csv id=coord fieldSep=semiColon autoCol=x autoRow=city colCount=2 values=1,2

The rows will be labeled with city1...city9, the columns with x1 and x2.

CSV2GDX_EXAMPLE3_coord.gif
Parameter coord displayed inside GAMS Studio

Load the parameter and sets from the GDX file to calculate the complete distance matrix. The set Dim1 contains the UELs city1...city9 for the set i of cities, Dim2 is the set of axes/coordinates i.e. containing the elements x1 and x2 to represent the x-axis and y-axis:

Set
   i    'cities'
   axes 'x1 and x2 axes';

$gdxIn EUCData.gdx
$load i    = Dim1
$load axes = Dim2

Parameter coord(i,axes) 'coordinate of city i';
$load coord
$gdxIn
display coord;

The display statement generates the following output:

----     43 PARAMETER coord  coordinate of city i

               x1          x2

city1     565.000     575.000
city2      25.000     185.000
city3     345.000     750.000
city4     945.000     685.000
city5     845.000     655.000
city6     880.000     660.000
city7      25.000     230.000
city8     525.000    1000.000
city9     580.000    1175.000

One could now easily proceed calculating a complete distance matrix:

Alias (i,j);

Parameter c(i,j) 'euclidean distance between city i and j';
c(i,j) = eDist(coord(i,"x1") - coord(j,"x1"),coord(i,"x2") - coord(j,"x2"));


Duplicates

In the previous example, using the autoCol and autoRow option had an additional benefit as we declared the set of the cities on the fly. However, one major advantage/purpose of these options is to prevent error messages or loss of data when reading rows with duplicate keys.

Consider the input file duplicates.csv:

red,red,1
red,red,2
red,green,3
blue,blue,4

Note the duplicate key in the first two rows. By the use of the autoRow parameter in the CSV2GDX call unique labels are added to each row. This way a GAMS program can store all data with duplicate keys and prepare for better error messages.

csv2gdx duplicates.csv id=data index=1,2 value=3 colCount=3 autoRow=row

Ascending numbers will be added to the 'row' prefix specified.

CSV2GDX_EXAMPLE3_duplicates.gif
Parameter data displayed inside GAMS Studio

The data can be easily loaded into sets and parameter by executing the following lines:

Set
   row   'UELs generated by autoRow'
   color 'set of colors';

$gdxIn duplicates.gdx
$load  row   = Dim1
$load  color = Dim2
$loadm color = Dim3

Parameter data(row,color,color);
$load data
$gdxIn
display row, color, data;

Note the usage of the $loadm command to merge all colors into one set of colors. The display statement generates the following output in the listing file:

----     77 SET row  UELs generated by autoRow

row1,    row2,    row3,    row4


----     77 SET color  set of colors

red  ,    blue ,    green


----     77 PARAMETER data  

                  red        blue       green

row1.red        1.000
row2.red        2.000
row3.red                                3.000
row4.blue                   4.000

The complete example is also part of the GAMS Data Utilities Library, see model [csv2gdx4] for reference.


Example 4 - Reading several Parameters from a single Input File

This example demonstrates how to read the data from a single input file into different parameters. However, this cannot be done directly using the CSV2GDX tool, since CSV2GDX writes to a single parameter (see section limitations). For instance, an energy supplier plans to build new transmission lines from their power plants to some distribution stations. There are different stages for the transmissions lines. The relevant data to be read are the plant and station identifiers, the capacity bounds per transmissions line on a certain stage and the associated cost. The data is all stored in a single file:

plant;station;length;minCap;maxCap;stage;cost
p1;s1;100;50;100;1;1200
p1;s2;75;35;65;1;500
p1;s1;100;100;150;2;1800
p2;s1;150;50;100;1;1400
p2;s1;150;100;150;2;2000
p2;s1;150;150;200;3;2350
p2;s2;75;25;50;1;600
p2;s2;75;50;75;2;800
p3;s1;80;40;100;1;1050

Read networkData.csv with CSV2GDX by calling:

csv2gdx networkData.csv id=dataPar useHeader=y fieldSep=semiColon index=1,2,6 values=4,5,7

Note that the stage stored in column six is a domain set, too, while the length of the transmission line in the third column is of no interest. Since CSV2GDX writes to a single parameter, one must split the data later on into minCap, maxCap and cost for instance:

Parameter
   dataPar
   minCap(plant,station,stage)
   maxCap(plant,station,stage)
   cost(plant,station,stage);

$gdxIn networkData.gdx
$load plant   = Dim1
$load station = Dim2
$load stage   = Dim3
$load dataPar
$gdxIn

minCap(plant,station,stage) = dataPar(plant,station,stage,'minCap');
maxCap(plant,station,stage) = dataPar(plant,station,stage,'maxCap');
cost(plant,station,stage)   = dataPar(plant,station,stage,'cost');

This example is also part of the GAMS Data Utilities Library, see model [csv2gdx5] for reference.


Example 5 - Reading economic Data from the World Bank Data Catalog

This example demonstrates how to read some real CSV data from the World Bank Data Catalog. Suppose we want to read some time series data, e.g. GDP growth rates. The data is structured as follows (rows shortened for presentation):

"Country Name","Country Code","Indicator Name","Indicator Code","1999","2000","2001","2002","2003","2004","2005","2006","2007","2008","2009","2010","2011","2012","2013","2014","2015","2016","2017","2018","2019","2020",
"East Asia and Pacific","EAA","GDP growth, constant 2010 USD","NYGDPMKTPKDZ","","","","","","","","","","","","","","","","","6.503564548","6.327469798","6.449458613","6.181694329","6.065321782","5.964012702",

We are not interested in the "Country Code", "Indicator Name" and "Indicator Code". Since the annual GDP rate per country is unique, the CSV2GDX call is quite easy despite the large number of columns. Note that there are only a few limitations of CSV2GDX, discussed in the section Advances and limitations. Empty fields in the data will always be ignored, causing no trouble at all if the field separators are set correctly.

csv2gdx GDPData.csv id=GDPG index=1 values=5..lastCol useHeader=y checkDate=y

The option checkDate is enabled to save resources if you run the model multiple times, as the GDX file is only written if the CSV file is more recent than the GDX file. To load the sets and parameter from the GDX file, execute the following commands:

Set country, year;
$gdxIn GDPData.gdx
$load  country = Dim1
$load  year    = Dim2

Parameter GDPRate(country,year);
$load GDPRate
$gdxIn
display country, year, GDPRate;

The display statement generates the following output in the listing file. Obviously, double quotes are removed from the fields of the value columns, but also from the index columns:

----     12 SET country  

East Asia and Pacific, Europe and Central Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, World (WBG members)            
Afghanistan          , Albania                , Algeria                        , Angola                      , Argentina , Armenia           , Azerbaijan               

----     12 SET year  

2015,    2016,    2017,    2018,    2019,    2020


----     12 PARAMETER GDPR  

                                       2015        2016        2017        2018        2019        2020

East Asia and Pacific                 6.504       6.327       6.449       6.182       6.065       5.964
Europe and Central Asia               0.963       1.672       3.782       2.901       3.029       2.969
Latin America and the Caribbean      -0.562      -1.526       0.902       2.044       2.586       2.701

Note that the listings have been shortened for presentation. However, there is no data for the years 1999-2014.

This example is also part of the GAMS Data Utilities Library, see model [csv2gdx6] for reference.


Additional Examples for extended Use

The examples in this section discuss some special features. Some topics were already mentioned briefly in the previous section like reading compressed and encrypted files or reading the CSV2GDX options from an external file.

Example 6 - Reading special Values

To illustrate how special values are interpreted, consider the following data:

one,two,three,four,five,six
red,red,,Undef,'3.3',red
red,red,"4.4",5.5,Eps,green
"red",'green',7.7e+02,8.8°,-Inf,blue
blue,blue,10,0,NA,purple
brown,blue,true,false,N/A,green
black,red,None,Null,"True",blue

Calling CSV2GDX to read the data and write to GDX:

csv2gdx data.csv id=A index=1,2,6 values=3..5 useHeader=y storeZero=y trace=3

The GAMS log reports three occurrences of undefined values. Note that the amount of information written to the log was increased by setting the option trace=3.

--- call csv2gdx specialValues.csv id=A index=1,2,6 values=3..5 useHeader=y storeZero=y trace=3
CSV2GDX          25.2.0 r67638 ALFA Released 15Aug18 WEI x86 64bit/MS Windows 
Header enabled, number of columns = 6
  1: one
  2: two
  3: three
  4: four
  5: five
  6: six
  2: |red|, |red|, ||, |Undef|, |'3.3'|, |red|
  3: |red|, |red|, |4.4|, |5.5|, |Eps|, |green|
  4: |red|, |'green'|, |7.7e+02|, |8.8°|, |-Inf|, |blue|
  5: |blue|, |blue|, |10|, |0|, |NA|, |purple|
Undef Count = 3, No errors, CSV2GDX time = 157ms

As mentioned in decimalSep, CSV2GDX fails to recognize the number 8.8 from the string 8.8° because of the unknown special character, while 7.7e+02 is interpreted as a number of course. Watch out if there are quotes in the values or index columns. The number 4.4 enclosed by double quotes is interpreted as a number, while '3.3' is not (as you can see in the log, the double quotes are eliminated, while the single quotes remain). In the first column, the double quotes enclosing the string red are removed, while the single quotes in the second column enclosing the string green are not removed. The zero value is stored as EPS by setting storeZero=y. Note that no error was reported, even though some of the values stored as Undef may cause some trouble in your model later on (use $onUndf to enable loading parameters with undefined values).
The booleans true and false in the second last row are represented by the numericals 1 resp. 0 within GAMS. The special values None and Null will be converted to 0. Since storeZore is enabled in this example, the value displayed for false, None and Null is EPS.

CSV2GDX_EXAMPLE6_A.gif
Parameter A displayed inside GAMS Studio

Suppose we want to declare the parameter A as: A(color,color,color,number). We can proceed as follows:

Set color, number;
$gdxIn data.gdx
$load  color = Dim1
$loadm color = Dim2
$loadm color = Dim3
$load number = Dim4

Parameter A(color,color,color,number);
$onUndf    
$load A
$offUndf
$gdxIn
display A;

Loading undefined values is enabled by adding $onUndf. This example is also part of the GAMS Data Utilities Library, see model [csv2gdx7] for reference.


Example 7 - Reading a compressed encrypted Input File

Reading a compressed input file is supported by CSV2GDX. The gzip program in the gbin sub-directory or ENDECRYPT must be used for compression. Call gzip to compress the CSV file by running the following command:

gzip compressMe.csv -c > compressedFile.csv.gz   

Gzip writes to standard output by appending -c to keep the original file unchanged. The output is then redirected to compressedFile.csv.gz. To read the compressed file, call CSV2GDX with the same options as for processing the uncompressed file.

csv2gdx compressedFile.csv.gz output=unCompressedGzipFile.gdx id=d index=1 useHeader=y values=2..lastCol

The data in this example is taken from Example 1.

While the main purpose of Endecrypt is about encrypting and decrypting files, it also compresses the file. If you want to compress a file with Endecrypt, do not specify an password file:

cat compressMe.csv | endecrypt -W compressedFile.csv 

The option -W encrypts standard input and writes to compressedFile.csv. Although there will be no encryption because of the missing password file, one must set the option -W. You can read the compressed file with CSV2GDX:

csv2gdx compressedFile.csv output=unCompressedEndycryptFile.gdx id=d index=1 useHeader=y values=2..lastCol

Note that there is no further file extension added.

By adding a password file (containing the password in the first line), Endecrypt encrypts and compresses the input file:

cat compressMe.csv | endecrypt -W compressedEncryptedFile.csv passwordFile.txt

The password file will be deleted. Execute the following command to read the compressed and encrypted file with CSV2GDX:

csv2gdx compressedEncryptedFile.csv output=unCompressedDecryptedFile.gdx password=Anton id=d index=1 useHeader=y values=2..lastCol

The password option is added. You must set the password directly within the option, in this case "Anton", not the password file. Note that CSV2GDX does not support .gz, .7z etc. compressed files!

This example is also part of the GAMS Data Utilities Library, see model [csv2gdx8] for reference.


Example 8 - Reading Options from an external File

This example demonstrates how to read the options from an external text file as already mentioned in section Filename. The file distance.csv from the Getting Started Example 1 will be processed with CSV2GDX while reading the options from an external text file named howToRead.txt.

csv2gdx distance.csv @howToRead.txt

Swapping the order of the CSV filename and the instructions filename inside the call statement will cause an error. Note the leading @ (at sign) on the instructions file, containing the following options:

* These lines are interpreted as a comment
* This file specifies the options for reading distance.csv using CSV2GDX

id         = d
fieldSep   = semiColon
decimalSep = comma
index      = 1
useHeader  = y
values     = 2..lastCol

This example is also part of the GAMS Data Utilities Library, see model [csv2gdx9] for reference.


Example 9 - Reading Set Elements with explanatory Text

In this example, we will demonstrate how to read explanatory text of set elements using the CSV2GDX option text.

Consider the input file data.csv:

a1,b1,explanatory text of a1.b1,10
a1,b2,explanatory text of a1.b2,20
a2,b1,explanatory text of a2.b1,30
a2,b2,explanatory text of a2.b2,40

The set elements are stored in the first and second column, the explanatory text is stored in the third column and there is a fourth column containing some values. Suppose we want to read a two-dimensional set with explanatory text. By default, CSV2GDX does not read explanatory text, i.e. by running the following command:

csv2gdx data.csv id=abOnlyUELs index=1,2 colCount=4

CSV2GDX creates a GDX file containing the two-dimensional set abOnlyUELs without explanatory text (needless to say, we did not specify a column to get the explanatory text from). By specifying the third column within the index option, i.e. index=1..3, the result will be a three-dimensional set (without explanatory text, too). Using the value option is not suitable, as the data type will be a parameter instead of a set (in addition, CSV2GDX expects numeric data, potentially leading to undefined values). We can read the explanatory text easily by specifying column three within the text option:

csv2gdx data.csv id=abWithExpText index=1,2 text=3 colCount=4 

The figure shows the set abOnlyUELs on the left without explanatory text and the set abWithExpText on the right:

CSV2GDX_EXAMPLE9.png
Sets abOnlyUELs and abWithExpText displayed inside GAMS Studio

Note that the text and value(s) options cannot be used at the same time (instead, use multiple CSV2GDX calls in scenarios when you wish to read set elements with explanatory text and parameters from a single data set).